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Puppy Prep: Dog Proofing The House Before You Bring Your New Fur Child Home

Are you planning on adding a four-legged family member? It’s an exciting time, and you’ll soon have your hands full with tasks like housebreaking, walking, and crate training. Before you bring your furry friend home, you’ll need to prepare by puppy-proofing your home. Anticipate that an energetic and curious puppy will stick their nose wherever they can, so it’s up to you to make your home safe.

Here are some basic steps to help you get started on dog-proofing your residence. Getting a new canine companion can also affect your homeowners insurance rates, depending on the breed. CoverHound is here to help you figure out the best coverage for your lifestyle!





Keep Drawers Locked

Dogs don’t have opposable thumbs, but they still have sneaky ways of slipping into drawers. You’ll want to invest in a solid child-proof latching system for drawers and cabinets throughout the house, especially if there’s something tempting or dangerous stored inside. Dogs don’t have the same jumping prowess as cats, but you’ll need to consider the puppy’s growth and firmly secure all relevant cabinets and drawers to avoid possible investigatory incidents.

Hide Toxic Substances

From everyday medications to common houseplants, there’s a whole range of substances that can be sickening or even fatal for puppies. Future dog owners can check out a comprehensive list of dangerous substances, but here are a few common items to keep far away from your dog:

-Medications like antidepressants, acetaminophen, opioids, sleep aids, and aspirin
-Plants like aloe, lilies, ferns, hydrangeas, poinsettias, and sago palms
-Chemicals like antifreeze, laundry detergent, hand sanitizer, kerosene, and glue
-Foods like avocado, garlic, grapes, mushrooms, raisins, salt, and onions

Electrical Equipment

Puppies love to chew. It’s a bummer if they chomp on one of your favorite leather shoes, but it’s a much worse situation if your precocious puppy starts chewing on electrical cords. Puppies who are experiencing teething may take it out on these rubber cords, which can be a dangerous route to electrocution.

As Pet MD recommends, double check outlets and electrical wiring before you bring your puppy home. Cover outlets securely, replace any damaged or delicate cords, tuck electrical equipment out of the way when possible, and consider covering cords in PVC pipe for added security.

Trash Containers

One man’s trash is another pup’s treasure. Unless you want to come home to a garbage-strewn space and play detective trying to figure out what your dog may have eaten, you’ll need to ramp up security around your garbage cans. Stow trash containers behind locked, puppy-proofed doors, and clean up any random clutter or garbage around your house before you introduce your dog to the landscape. Be mindful moving forward that anything you set on the floor or low-resting tables becomes fair game for your four-legged friend.

Getting a dog will likely change your life in a drastic way. You’ll experience unconditional love and maybe even find more motivation to spend time outdoors on a daily basis. Choosing certain breeds can actually affect how much you pay in insurance premiums. Before you bring your puppy home, carefully prepare your residence and research homeowners insurance options with CoverHound.

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